Inaugural UK L’Art de la Guerre Tournament results

ADLG Day Sunday 8th of February

Results

Name Army Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Total Position
Alasdair Harley Hellenistic Greek 96 96 41 233 1st
Sebastien Mithradatic 96 93 41 230 2nd
Simon Clarke Spartacus 41 95 93 229 3rd
Brian Holmes Classical Indian 96 17 94 207 4th
Geoff Punshon Early Carthaginian 45 45 97 187 5th
Dave Fairhurst Late Imperial Roman 45 45 93 183 6th
Linda Fairhurst Palymran 39 94 41 174 7th
Tim Porter Late Imperial Roman 36 91 41 168 8th
Andy Finkle Alexandrian Macedonian 42 95 17 154 9th
Clive Mcleod Numidian’s 94 14 13 121 10th
Simon Le Re Mayer Early Imperial Roman 41 16 43 100 11th
Mark Clarke Early Imperial Roman 14 43 43 100 11th
Dave Saunders Alexander the Great 36 46 17 99 13th
Jesse Schoor Syracusan 14 37 47 98 14th
Matthew Scott Classical Indian 43 15 40 98 14th
Peter Card Early Successor 14 37 34 85 16th
Ray Boyles Early Imperial Roman 16 19 38 73 17th
Andy Scott Classical Indian 43 15 13 71 18th

Competiton rules were

Competition Rules : 200 point armies with standard sized 200 point tables of 120cm x 80cm. Players must bring their own terrain pieces

Lists to be drawn from either Classical Period or Roman Period army lists – From Rise to Fall, Rome : 503 BC- 476

Campaigns of Germanicus – recapture the eagle

The disaster at Teutoburger Wald was decisive only insofar as it drove the Romans back across the Rhine. The German tribes lacked the capacity to follow-up and were in any event satisfied with regaining their autonomy. Despite a few forays which amounted to little strategically but got the by Tiberius, w future emperor a Triumph, the Romans stayed behind the safety of the river. They were still profoundly shocked by Varus’s defeat, and the Empire could not spare the resources to mount a major invasion into German territory. Both sides therefore, watched each other warily but in relative comfort. But history suggests that Romans, like elephants, never forget, and they would be back. It would not be Tiberius who would lead the Roman retaliation but Germanicus, the great nephew of Augustus and adopted son of Tiberius.

For our 3rd game in the campaign we try to represent the recapture of the Eagle of the XIX. The format of the game was far more ‘straight up’ than in the previous two games. The roman field was formed up arrayed for battle. There were 7 objective dotted around the table, 3 of these would be potential spots for the Eagle. Each of these 3 would give the Romans a 33% of winning the game. Anything else would be a German victory. The other 4 would have some random effect on the game, because I like the moans and groans of that this generates.

In 14AD the Senate appointed Germanicus to take command of the armies on the Rhine at a time when the soldiers were in a state of mutiny. The major issues were the terms and conditions of service, including a brutal disciplinary regime. Germanicus was highly popular with the rank and file, and he solved the crisis through appeals to loyalty and selective purges of mutineers. He also adopted the tried and trusted method of leading his into the troops out field. Their target was the completely unsuspecting Marsi. Germanicus advanced with a caution that might have saved Varus had he adopted the same methods. He made sure the route was properly scouted and that his flanks and rear were well protected at all times. For the attacking Germans, ambushing a rabble was one thing, but taking on a disciplined Roman army quite another. Despite their best efforts to cause disruption, the frantic warriors could not break the Roman formations and were quite easily repulsed Germanicus laid waste to a broad swathe of German territory before returning to winter quarters. The following spring Germanicus was back, this time pushing into Chatti territory. Through the ame methodical approach, he captured and burned their capital and dispersed the survivors. Germanicus split his forces and gave command of the smaller army to Aulus Caecina who promptly defeated the Cherusci

 germ1The Romans deploy preparing to search for the eagle

Probably seeing the writing on the wall, Arminius’s besieged rival chieftain Segestes who appealed to Germanicus for relief. The Roman commander was happy to oblige and rescued Segestes along with much of the plunder taken from Varus, and captured Arminius’s wife. For this and his general success, Germanicus was given the title Imperator. Arminius, on the other hand, was incensed at this personal and military setback and exhorted the tribes to redouble their efforts against the Romans. The prospect of the German tribes reunifying under a rejuvenated Arminius alarmed Germanicus. He therefore decided to hit the Germans while they were mobilizing. He ordered Caecina to march through the Bructeri and instructed the cavalry commander Pedo to attack the Frisii Germanicus put four legions on board ships and sailed through the lakes to meet his subordinate commanders at the River Amisia. Once that was affected, he despatched flying a column under Lucius Sertinus against the Bructeri. In a lightning campaign he routed the German tribe and in doing so recaptured the lost Eagle of Legion XIX.

germ2

The Germans slowly appear out of the mist

Germanicus followed up with another destructive march through German territory in the region of the Teutoburger Wald. With no local opposition in the area, Germanicus took the opportunity to visit the site of the his massacre with army. It was therefore thoroughly sobered Roman army that a set off in pursuit of Arminius. Arminius was a master ambush and proved it again when at Germanicus’s cavalry pursued the Germans across the plains and into the Wald. The retreating warriors suddenly turned joined by others hidden in the woods and fought back the cavalry and an infantry reserve help Only sent to tory the timely arrival of Germanicus with the main army prevented a minor disaster. Seeing no advantage in further pursuit, Germanicus decided to withdraw by boat, but not Caecina and his divisions to march home by way of a narrow road surrounded by as the Long marshes and hills known his ridges. Arminius followed Caecina, waiting for moment to pounce. Caecina’s predicament was that he was in hostile territory surrounded by a fearsome enemy, and his path home urgent repairs. He hunkered down while his own engineers set to work under armed protection. The Germans skirmished relentlessly with the Romans, trying to get at the engineers. They had the advantage of being more lightly armoured than the Romans, as well as knowing the terrain

germ3The battle lines form.

Probably seeing the writing on the wall, Arminius’s besieged rival chieftain Scgestes who appealed to Germanicus for relief. The Roman commander was happy to oblige and rescued Segestes along with much of the plunder taken from Varus, and captured Arminius’s wife. For this and his general success, Germanicus was given the title Imperator. Arminius, on the other hand, was incensed at this personal and military setback and exhorted the tribes to redouble their efforts against the Romans.

germ4A large clash of arms in the centre

The prospect of the German tribes reunifying under a rejuvenated Arminius alarmed Germanicus. He therefore decided to hit the Germans while they were mobilizing. He ordered Caecina to march through the Bructeri and instructed the cavalry commander Pedo to attack the Frisii. Germanicus put four legions on board ships and sailed through the lakes to meet his subordinate commanders at the River Amisia. Once that was effected, he despatched flying a column under Lucius Stertinus against the Bructeri. In a lightning campaign, he routed the German tribe and in doing so recaptured the lost Eagle of Legion XIX. Germanicus followed up with another destructive march through German territory in the region of the Teutoburger Wald. With no local opposition in the area, Germanicus took the opportunity to visit the site of the massacre with his army. It was therefore thoroughly sobered Roman army that a set off in pursuit of Arminius.

germ5

Arminius was a master ambush and proved it again when at Germanicus’s cavalry pursued the Germans across the plains and into the Wald. The retreating warriors suddenly turned joined by others hidden in the woods and fought back the cavalry and an infantry reserve help. Only the timely arrival of Germanicus with the main army prevented a minor disaster. Seeing no advantage in further pursuit Germanicus decided to withdraw by boat, but not Caecina and his divisions to march home by way of a narrow road surrounded by marshes and hills known the Long Bridges. Arminius followed Caecina, waiting for moment to pounce.

As a brief synopsis of our game. One of the random event was that the Germans we’re allowed an ambush as a largely undetermined position. This turned out to be right in the middle of the roman lines. The 3 large warbands were outnumbered, but could dealt a lot of damage and potentially dishearten the Romans. However, the dice determined that the Romans were not to be trifled with and this large ambush was swept away for no lose, and the Romans could advance unimpeded.  In FoG:AM the Germans are at at 16% disadvantage. During the initial clash they are evens, but they then suffer for the remainder of the melee. They have to be lucky initially otherwise they will be ground down by the Roman mincing machine. Largely the Germans were not lucky, and with much wailing and gnashing of teeth the Romans held them back and slowly destroyed there barbarian foes. The scenario rules meant that the Germans would fight on past there normal army break, while the Romans had to be precious about their loses.

After 3 hours the Romans has captured 2 of the 3 objectives where the Eagle would be found.  After much slaughter the Germans felt aggrieved (seemingly forgetting the joyous destruction of the Romans in the earlier games)… However, when it came to see who had won the game. The dice was thrown …  1-4 (2 objectives) Roman win, 5-5 (1 objective) German victory. The dice came up 6. German victory.

So in our campaign the Germans are 3 games up to none

Notable highlights.

  • Lynnette throwing double six , followed by a successive 11 to kill both of Peters generals in the melee. Despite this set back Pete was the only German player to cause the Legions any inconvenience.
  • Simon who excelled himself with his moaning at his lot in the game. Noted for his moaning, he went above and beyond in his pursuance to find misery in a club game 😉

 

 

Club competition – USK – Godendag

Godendag is a competition that we have been competing in  for over 20 years now. It started out as DBM , moving to FoG:AM and now FoG:R. It has become an annual ritual each January, with the weather often proving a trial for attendance. The event is run by Richard Bodley Scott, who is the author of the rules, and is set in rural Wales, just past the Wye Valley before you get to the south coast.

GODENDAG 
VENUE: Glen-yr-Afon Hotel, Pontypool Rd, Usk, Monmouthshire, NP15 1SY

http://www.byzant.demon.co.uk

For the club is probably the only event that most people come to, so it is a good chance to take in a few board games, a leisurely pint or two and not forgetting the excitement of the competition.

usk_wayne

usk_ray_lynette

usk_simon

usk_jon_pete

usk_ian_steve

usk_dene_paul

This Year (2015), we has a winning team – which is a first

IMG_0062.JPG

IMG_0063.JPG

Square Bashing List Generator

I have put together a spreadsheet that helps generate army lists for excellent peter pig Square Bashing Rule Set.

It is not complicated but does take some of the ‘brain ache’ away when trying to squeeze that last unit into the points limit!  It is also intended to act as an easy reference for the starting asset values.  If I have uploaded this correctly it can be found from this link;

http://badwargamers.com/bad/?attachment_id=806

Please feel free to use this but it is definitely not for commercial exploitation.

Let me know if there is a problem.

Paul